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Allergies and Inflammation

March 25, 2011

Some of the primary roles of the immune system are to heal itself, and to defend the body against attack from pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, and molds. In some overly-sensitive people however, the immune system may perceive harmless substances, allergens (e.g., peanuts, pollen, dust mites, pet dander), as putting the body at risk of infection.

Allergies result from a heightened immune response to false threats. People with allergies typically suffer from inflammatory symptoms such as swelling and irritation of nasal passages, excessive mucus production, runny noses, sneezing, and itchy eyes.

Most of this discomfort is due to the presence of both large immune factors,(antibodies), and smaller immune factors, (such as cytokines), that are released when immune cells are triggered by allergens. The type of antibody most commonly associated with allergic reactions is called IgE (immunoglobulin E). IgE attaches tightly to special immune cells called mast cells, found just under the skin and in the linings of our lungs and intestines.

Mast cells are loaded with inflammatory factors. At the body’s next exposure to the allergen, it binds to the IgE, like a key going into a lock, and “switches” on the mast cell production of powerful biochemicals like histamine and cytokines. These bioactive molecules cause inflammation indirectly, as well as directly, by activating neighboring immune cells to release additional inflammatory molecules.

If you are overly responsive to allergens, the last thing you want is to over stimulate your immune system by using a so-called “immune booster”; it is just asking for more trouble. i26 has been proven in numerous clinical trials to partner with the body to provide balanced immunological responses. Two or more daily servings of i26, along with daily exercise and proper food choices helps the body support its natural healing abilities and appropriate levels of immune activity.

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From → The Wife's Side

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